Seeing Double on Broadway - 221 W 82nd & 222 W 83rd St

If you happened to be walking on Broadway between 82nd and 83rd Street and glance up at the two buildings on the east side of the street, you can rest assured that you are not seeing double. These buildings, 221 West 82nd Street and 222 West 83rd Street, are twin buildings.

222 West 83rd Street and 221 West 82nd Street - Looking East on Broadway

222 West 83rd Street and 221 West 82nd Street - Looking East on Broadway

As the 1920’s brought a building boom to the Upper West Side, the developer Sam Minskoff, a former plumber, was on his way to becoming a prolific NYC developer. Architect, Emery Roth, whose very first building design, the Saxony, built in 1900 and located just down the street at 250 West 82nd, was also earning accolades for his work. Minskoff, having already worked with Roth, once again commissioned him to work on what would become the first of a two building project.

Similarities of the Front Entrances - 221 W. 82nd is a Condop and 222 W 83rd is a Rental Building

Similarities of the Front Entrances - 221 W. 82nd is a Condop and 222 W 83rd is a Rental Building

The first of the two, located on 82nd Street, was named the Myron Arms, and the second, built a year later on 83rd, was called Jerome Palace. Both were named after his sons. Myron, Jerome and a third son, Henry, would eventually take over the family business of Sam Minskoff and Sons and in the 1970’s would oversee the construction of what Broadway theater lovers would come to know as the Minskoff Theater.

Can you spot the differences?

Can you spot the differences?

Key features of the Italian Renaissance inspired designs of the two buildings include the use of granite, limestone, brick and terracotta. Each of the buildings are topped with a setback penthouse floor. There are some slight variations between the two, so the next time you are passing by, look up and see if you can detect the differences.

To learn more about how Sam Minskoff and Emery Roth began their working relationship read this: http://www.chestercourt.com/about-us

If you enjoyed this post, please feel free to share.

Pamela Ajhar

Norman Rockwell Place

Norman Rockwell Place
Amsterdam Avenue and West 103rd Street

 

Street sign 103rd and Amsterdam

 

A group of High School juniors and seniors from the Edward A. Reynolds West Side High School took an idea they came up with in their civics class to the City Council. In commemoration of Norman Rockwell’s early years living in their neighborhood on the Upper West Side, the students conducted a yearlong campaign to have the southeast corner of Amsterdam and 103rd Street renamed “Norman Rockwell Place”. Their persistence will finally pay off this Thursday the 9th of June when a street naming ceremony will take place, in which the new street sign will be affixed.

Students and faculty from Edward A. Reynolds West Side High School outside Norman Rockwell’s studio, during a recent visit to Norman Rockwell Museum. Photo ©Norman Rockwell Museum. All rights reserved.

Students and faculty from Edward A. Reynolds West Side High School outside Norman Rockwell’s studio, during a recent visit to Norman Rockwell Museum. Photo ©Norman Rockwell Museum. All rights reserved.

Norman Rockwell was born on February 3, 1894 in a brownstone at 206 West 103rd Street (the building is no longer there) where he lived until he was two years old. His family then moved to Harlem and later in life, he resided at the Hotel des Artistes at 1 West 67th Street and Central Park West. Most people are familiar with Rockwell’s illustrations of small town America, many of which he painted for the covers of the Saturday Evening Post, creating images for 321 issues over a 47 year period. But some of his most important work came after he ended his relationship with the Post and began working for Look Magazine, turning his attention to some of the social issues facing the country in the 60’s, such as poverty, racial discrimination and the Vietnam War.

Here is a link with the details of the sign unveiling on June 9th http://www.nrm.org/2016/06/norman-rockwell-place-unveiled-special-ceremony-new-york-city-june-9/

For a real treat, visit the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge Massachusetts. Here you will find a fantastic collection of his original paintings. The Museum is open year round and studio visits are available from May to November.